Going Small, Cozy and Safe!


Image: Irie at twilight — Jerri Hudson named her 1000-square-foot Monolithic Dome home “Irie,” which means “alright” in Jamaican.

Irie at twilight — Jerri Hudson named her 1000-square-foot Monolithic Dome home “Irie,” which means “alright” in Jamaican.Freda Parker Published Featured Dome Homes

 

Image: Living room — It’s cozy, well lit and decorated with Jamaican art.
Living room — It’s cozy, well lit and decorated with Jamaican art.

Image: Small footprint; spacious look — Jim Kaslik designed the interior of this small dome-home to look open and spacious.
Small footprint; spacious look — Jim Kaslik designed the interior of this small dome-home to look open and spacious.

Image: Efficient workplace — Jerri enjoys cooking in her small but efficient kitchen.
Efficient workplace — Jerri enjoys cooking in her small but efficient kitchen.

Image: Office — The home includes a convenient office work area.
Office — The home includes a convenient office work area.

Image: Complementary roundness — Circular window extensions frame conventional square windows and complement the roundness of the dome.
Complementary roundness — Circular window extensions frame conventional square windows and complement the roundness of the dome.

Image: Pet area — Jerri’s pet has his own area and private entrance.
Pet area — Jerri’s pet has his own area and private entrance.

Image: Bathroom — It features an easy-to-care-for tile shower, counter top and floor.
Bathroom — It features an easy-to-care-for tile shower, counter top and floor.

Image: Low maintenance — Like the dome itself, the fence that encircles it needs little upkeep.
Low maintenance — Like the dome itself, the fence that encircles it needs little upkeep.

Image: All she wanted — Her dome-home provides the security, energy efficiency and comfort Jerri wanted.
All she wanted — Her dome-home provides the security, energy efficiency and comfort Jerri wanted.

 

Irie is Jamaican for alright

And Irie is the name owner Jerri Hudson chose for her new, 1000-square-foot Monolithic Dome home that sits on a 40-acre, wooded site in Missouri.

Since moving in this past November, Jerri has found her new home both comfortable and secure — exactly what she wanted.

Worldwide, extreme weather prompts construction of Monolithic Dome

Jerri said, “I lived in Jamaica for several years, and, during that time, I experienced a few hurricanes. All the while, back in Missouri, where my family and friends were, the tornadoes seemed to be rampant.

“I knew things weren’t going to get better, and I really didn’t want to live in a house that could not protect me both day and night, even when I slept.”

Preparedness

Besides security, Jerri wanted energy efficiency. She said, “I feel times/events throughout the world are going to create a harder life and become a more expensive life for everyone. I want to be as prepared as possible for harder times and, hopefully, suffer as little as possible.”

Research led to www.monolithic.com

While researching sculptured, Shotcrete homes in Mexico that she had seen on HGTV, Jerri came across Monolithic’s website.

“The more I read,” Jerri said, “the more impressed I was.” Both the amount of information and the categories covered amazed her. “It has information on just about every issue or question one could possibly think of — and is most helpful with the listings of builders and designers, state-by-state.”

Feeling of space within a small footprint

That was Jim Kaslik’s design goal for Jerri’s home. Jim said, “When budget limits the house size, there are things that can be done to maximize the perception of space.”

He separated two domes with a foyer, thus creating a public space with living room, kitchen and powder room and a distinct, private space with bedroom, bath and walk-in closet.

Jim overcame the risk of separate segments not looking unified by connecting the foyer’s roof line to the circular window extension, and he credits builder Ray Ansel for doing “a great job of detailing that.”

As a result, when you look at Jerri’s dome, your eye focuses on the entrance, rather than the whole structure, reinforcing the desired perception of a small, but cozy, home.

What the neighbors think

Jerri said, “Reactions have been positive. I’m not sure everyone who has seen it wants one, but they are always in awe of it. Most people think it’s the neatest thing they have ever seen.”

Kudos for Cloud Hidden Designs and R&S Lifeline Domes

Jerri is pleased with Irie’s design and construction. She said, “Both Jim Kaslik and Ray Ansel went above and beyond with advice on what would work best in this type of home, from skylights to doggy doors. They are very enthusiastic about what they do and it’s catchy!”

Note: This article was originally presented in March 2007.

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